Digital School of Autoethnography

What is this?

An intensive interdisciplinary digital course of autoethnography for international participants. The course is in English language, it includes 9 video lectures, mentoring sessions and it lasts 35 days.

Call for participation is open on an ongoing basis.

PAN(DEM)IC 

The COVID19 pandemic is temporarily reshaping societies, forcing countries all over the world to lockdown; the panic that accompanies the extreme measures and the fear from the virus characterize the reaction given by societies to the extraordinary situation.

Scrutiny is necessary, both in case of the virus and of the emergency reaction to it.

Autoethnographic research will give a chance – both to researchers and their audiences – to reflect on the panic reaction in the body of society, as well as in the individuals constituting it.

We strongly believe that this reflections can act as antibodies against the devastation of the pan(dem)ic and they might lead us towards developing a sustainable resistance against the crisis.

The global pandemic weighs as a burden on our everyday lives. As limiting the crisis and socio-economic recession it brings with itself may be, social scientists, researchers and artists must re-think and re-invent ways we can function and connect as individuals. It is a moment when, more than ever in recent history, people from all over the world sense that their daily problems and fears, as well as their hopes are similar - no matter where and in what conditions they live. It would be a mistake not to build on this feeling of community given that we already have to find new grounds for social and cultural life.

We consider this rapport a great opportunity to put our philosophy – documents can be art as much as art can be documents – to action.  We’re offering everybody interested, regardless of educational background, a set of both artistic and scientific tools to document and analyze their reality.

Articulating thoughts and feelings in a meaningful way and with a meticulous approach is not just an important way of communication with others, but valuable resource for re-inventing society in a moment no less of historical.

Miklós Barna-Lipkovski  is a filmmaker and documentarist born in Budapest in 1987, spent his childhood years in Rome. Lived in Budapest, Bologna, Berlin and is currently based in Belgrade. Works as a freelance photographer, video artist and journalist as well. He finished his MA in television journalism and documentary film directing in 2006 at the University of Film and Theatre in Budapest. He has been working in digital media covering different fields ever since. His focus has been split between journalistic and artistic approach towards video- and filmmaking. After years of working on political and cultural journalism, due to political changes in Eastern Europe and the Balkans today he focuses more on art. Speaks Hungarian, Serbian, Italian, English, German and Spanish. He is a founder and the technical director of Visual Anthropology Center and the Krov (Roof) Social Center.

Valentino Bianchi  was born in 1988 in Rome, Italy. After several years abroad, (England, Spain, Kuwait) and a year in Palermo, Sicily he is now based in Paris. He is a reportage and portrait photographer specialized in the analog and film photography. While he began taking photographs several years ago, he only started taking the medium of photography seriously when he discovered the hands-on nature of black-and-white film and what are now referred to as 'traditional' printing methods. For him, nothing else can do this. “Film photography allows me to consider my work over time as part of a creative process. I thoroughly enjoy develop and printing my own negatives.“ He is currently working on two long term reportage and he documents the everyday life of the people that lives the city of Rome, especially for the Rione Trastevere, working for the local newspapers.

Elena Georgievska  Stevanić  was born in 1987 in Skopje, North Macedonia, is a psychologist and family psychotherapist. She graduated 2012. at Ss. Cyril and Methodius University in Skopje, Faculty of Philosophy, department of psychology. Her graduate thesis was „Social control of the self in the capitalist society, and ab(use) of psychology“. After graduating she had internship in the Clinic for psychiatry in Skopje. She moved in Belgrade, Serbia in 2014. and finish training program in systemic family therapy organized by Association of Systemic Therapists (AST). Psychological support for parents of children with special needs, and group psychotherapy for people with rheumatoid arthritis are part of her working experience. Her work with clients, is mainly influenced by critical psychology and critical psychotherapy.

Thomas John  is a Research Associate at the Department of Cultural Anthropology, Institute for Latin American Studies at the Free University Berlin, Germany. At the moment he is finalizing his PhD thesis on affective and emotional negotiations within a local South Mexican indigenous audio-visual documentary art scene. He is a trained filmmaker and visual anthropologist, too, and teaches since 2013 practical and theoretical audio-visual anthropology classes at the WWU Münster, where he is involved at the Institute of Ethnology and the MA Visual Anthropology, Media and Documentary Practices. https://weiterbildung.uni-muenster.de/anthropology He is interested especially in exploring the filed of intersection between documentary arts and visual anthropology, artistic research practices, and experimental modes of the representation of human experience.

Vanja Matić is a Belgrade based clinical psychologyst. She is currently on her master studies of clinical psychology on Faculty of philosophy, focusing on work with war veterans. Besides, her interests goes in film as well, so she has finished course of film directing, and she works as a freelance production coordinator in advertisement industry. Since last year she is also a member of „Vizantrop“, Belgrade based collective focused on audio-visual culture, promotion of visual anthropology and ethnographic film, and „Prostor“ (Space) a Belgrade based association focused on social inclusion of psychiatric patients trough art therapy and art programs.

Nina Mladenović graduated from the Faculty of Philosophy in Ethnology and Anthropology, and is currently pursuing a master's degree in Cultural Politics and Management in Culture. In 2016 she attended the School of Visual Anthropology (ŠVA) in Belgrade and ŠVA workshop in Skopje and later on, in 2019, became a mentor at this school (ŠVA Belgrade and ŠVA Osijek). She is a part of the Vizantrop collective where she worked on publishing online magazine for interdisciplinary research of audiovisual culture and on organizing festival of engaged ethnographic films – Vizantrop. In April 2019 she participated in a research workshop held in Rovin organized by ETNOFILm Festival. She is co-author of three short ethnographic films screened at festivals in Serbia and the region.

Relja Pekić is a master of ethnology and anthropology, a documentary and visual anthropologist from Belgrade, and his interest in the field of scientific research is mostly focused on visual anthropology, anthropology of sport, anthropology of tourism, applied anthropology and sensory ethnography. Editor of the magazine for interdisciplinary audiovisual research, visual anthropology and ethnographic film - "Vizantrop". He is the author of several short ethnographic films that were screened at ethnographic festivals in Ljubljana, Zadar, Prague, Belgrade, Prizren, Moscow and Skopje, and for the film "Crossroads of Culture" (2013) he received the audience award for the best student film at SEF festival in Croatia. He is a founder and the director of Visual Anthropology Center and the Krov (Roof) Social Center.

Ana Popović (1987) is a theatre director, educator and researcher based in Belgrade, Serbia. She is one of the founders of Threepenny company and Visual Anthropology Center from Belgrade. In 2013-14 she spent a year as an awarded scholarship student in the Institute for Traditional Arts of Indonesia, researching on anthropological performances of wayang kulit, one of the oldest theatrical forms in the world. The result is her master thesis “Wayang kulit – tradition, identity and challenges” in 2015. which placed Popović as an expert in South-East Asian performing arts in Serbia. She is a guest lecturer at Faculty of Dramatic Arts in History of Drama and Theatre - Intercultural praxis. At the moment she is a PhD student of transdisciplinary studies of art and media at Faculty of Media and Communication in Belgrade, Serbia, where she is mostly focused on postcolonial and posthumanistic discourses and new trends in speculative realism studies, in the fields of art and aesthetic.

Nikola Radeka is an ethnomusicologist from Belgrade. He graduated ethnomusicology at University of Arts in Belgrade (Faculty of music). His master thesis examined tonal relations and tone measurements of old traditional two-part singing of the Banija region. Since 2008. he started to practice Ethnomusicological field research, which included vocal practice of war refugees and buskers in Belgrade, postmortal Vlach rituals, practice of electronic music performers, but mainly old two-part singing of Kordun, Banija and Potkozarje regions, which is currently his main research focus. One of the founders and director of Ethnomusicological activities centre, within which he executed numerous projects regarding ethnomusicological field research in areas of Serbia, Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina, realization of documentary films, as well as festivals of traditional music in Paris and Belgrade. Active as a music producer and electronic music performer since 2015.

Miloš Tomić is a Sunday animator but daily filmmaker. Born 1976. Studied film directing in Belgrade, animation In Prague, Berlin, Madrid. For a year studied anthropology. Beside film, experimented a lot with photo-collages, photography, radio-miniatures, writhing, drawing, music, object making and precious thrash collecting…Led more around 70 workshops all around. Participated in numerous festivals and exhibitions with variable success. In 2013 was Serbian representative at Venice Biennale. Still curious to notice neglected, off-sided, by chanced, mistaken, false, bad copy, collateral…beauty as potential place to start.

Vanessa Zallot is a graduate student at the Institute of European Ethnology of the Humboldt-University of Berlin. During her studies she focused among other topics on Visual and Digital Anthropology, Urban Anthropology and Queer Studies. Currently, she is finishing her MA with a thesis in which she is dealing with research ethics and reflexivity in the anthropological use of the camera as a method between theory and practice. She is especially interested in power critical methodologies and questions of representations of ethnographic knowledge. Besides one of her focuses is a queer-feminist perspective on popular media, film and film practice.

1. Autoethnography as a method in anthropological research

Nina Mladenović & Relja Pekić

In this lecture we will present the basic principles of autoethnographic writing in anthropology, as a method which implies the intersection of personal, lived experiences of a researcher with socio-political context that shaped and enabled these experiences. Throughout the lecture we will speak about the advantages of using autoethnography as a method but also encourage critical thinking and consider possible problems researchers might encounter while using this method. Some of the questions we will try to answer are: What is authoethnography and when shuould we use it as a method? How do we differentiate autoethnography from self-analysis? What are the techniques of authoethnographic writing? What are ethical dilemmas within authoethnographic research and how to overcome them?

2. Queer Autoethnography

Vanessa Zallot

In this input session we draw upon ideas of queer methodology and ask the question how these ideas can be helpful in our ways of thinking about (audio-/visual) autoethnography. By the idea of queer as a critique of multiple power structures that are written into our daily lives and the academia, the question is opened up, what power structures and normativities we might reproduce in our research practice. How could these be reflected methodologically? And how might it be a starting point for generating and acknowledging new kinds of knowledge apart from those normatively deemed ‚normal‘ and ‚scientific‘?

3. Sonic Autoethnography 

Nikola Radeka

Aim of this lecture is to inspire and encourage its participants to engage in a research of sonic self - to actively listen, pre-select, record, select and organize sounds that they produce and that they are surrounded with on a daily basis.

Participants will be guided through both the theory and practice of Sonic/Aural Autoethnography by video lectures and mentoring sessions, which will cover the following:

  • Introduction to Autoethnography and placing Sonic Autoethnography within the heterogeneous field of Autoethnography;
  • Repositioning sonic perspective: comprehension of oneself's relation to the quotidian soundworld, broadening aural perspectives by a range of selected listening practices, discovering specific aspects of auditory self;
  • Sonic scenography: developing situational awareness from environmental sound events;
  • Telling a story: recognizing, developing and layering narratives through sound;
  • Learning classical and traditional music composing techniques and music forms to be implemented in the creation process;
  • Unleashing the intrinsic sonic potential through self-experiments.

Sonic Autoethnographies may reflect in many possible outcomes depending on the methodology of content preselection, different sound creation and recording techniques, as well as the final sound organization / composing and postproduction, even combining the sound with other media. Participants will be encouraged to express themselves in one or more of the following formats combined: Self-sufficient/self-explanatory field recordings; Sonic or music diaries; Aural postcards; Sonic scenography;  Sonic poetry; Self-composed songs or music pieces; Multichannel soundscape compositions; Headphone pieces; Public sound installations; Aural interventions in space; Voice experiments (different narrative types); Format free releases.

4. Autoethnography – the Self and the Senses

Thomas John

In this class we look especially at audio-visual autoethnographies that exploit and experiment sensory cinema methods. Interestingly, quite a number of autoethnographic films have been attempting to mediate meanings about the Self through the senses. Investigating sensory experience is not easy, because it is highly embodied and driven by affects. The moment we speak and interview about it, it is yet not the same thing anymore. We also cannot observe it easily, since sensory experience is highly subjective and interior. However, if you do an autoethnography, you might be able to have very immediate access to sensory experience, obviously, since it is your very own! Still, it remains a challenge to represent your own senses. You feel them, but you’ll need to (audio-)visualize them.

We will have a look at a few filmic examples/excepts, catch up with some theoretical debates and you’ll do a short one-minute sensory autoethnographic video exercise – you submit it before the digital summer school starts – and I’ll react to it in my video lecture. In the aftermath of the class, your individual responses via e-mail thomasj@gmx.net or skype are very welcome and I’ll be happy to get into dialogue with you, to go beyond the limitations of the one-dimensional setup of a prerecorded video lecture.

5. Cinematic language as a form of autoethnographic expression.

Miklós Barna Lipkovski

An unprecedented percentage of the World population had to quickly learn how can quaranteen, self-isolation, social distancing – words that didn’t mean much for most of us until yesteryear – all of a sudden define our lives. No matter whether you are in New York, Rome or Belgrade, you are facing hardships of a similar nature.

Ethno –  nation – graphy – writing: the origin of the words points us to the right direction. How can you describe your society through the example you know best – yourself.

Auto means self, yet autoethnography is everything but a fancy word for selfie. Without the context of (y)our current predicament a cinematic analysis of the part of your life you can share with an audience is only relevant as a document(ary) if you are not the object, but the subject of such examination.

This lecture aims to be a toolkit of cinematic thinking for ethnographic researchers.

6. Photography as a form of autoethnography

Valentino Bianchi

This lecture will be divided in two sections:

  • Brief explanation of some projects that has been important in the field of photography during a moment of quarantine. Some will show projects born and executed inside one only room or apartment, some other will show projects made during the last moment of quarantine in our world.
  • Genesis of a photographic project, how to build an idea and to finalize it: Reference, developing, material, basic knowledge of a photographic narration, possible finalization of the project.

The lecture aims to provide technical tools and examples of what we could build trough a study of autoethnography in the context of the world surrounding us.

7. Play with everyday

Miloš Tomić

My lecture invites you to look closer into chosen phenomena of your everyday life and to play with them. I will suggest tools like: discrete and loud actions, drawings in non comfortable conditions, video diary of certain kind, science-like collection, stop-motion techniques as therapy...all that with a reason to deal differently with your flat, mess in your room, neighbors,...someone you secretly fantasied about.

Some of those “games”, I tried in my previous works, so I am offering one possible method but it is more like a starting point. For others, I am planning to use you as laboratory mice for ways to encourage myself to try, whatever happens!

8. Possible paradigmatic shifts in performing arts

Ana Popović

Keywords: crisis, body, media, theatricality, perceptive turn

Usually when we mention anthropological approach to performing arts, we think of rituals, rites of passages, transferring and transformative patterns of human behavior and roles of any kind. The most interesting part of the ritual, understood in the terms of Turner, is the so-called liminal state. It is a state in which we need to shift our perception from ‘what it used to be’ to ‘what it will become’. It is deeply political situation as well as aesthetical. Performing arts, unlike others, are essentially and exclusively humanistic oriented. They adapt to human behavior, the same way human needs to adapt to new circumstance. That is also a very specific ability of the spe(c)tator in the performance – redefining relations of all kinds, while interpretation and reinterpretation (of self, of others, of objects, of spacetime) are essentially creative processes. Right now, the most of our reality is mediated through technology. This tells a lot about human behavior and vice versa. Our bodies are under new regulations, and also the way we (are expected to) behave. We cannot group, gather, perform live, be close to each other. Internet shows that it is not able to mediate performance arts. But, internet, which also makes most of our reality, is full of theatricality and we perceive it in a specific liminal way.

It didn’t seem that this digital revolution would feel so corporeal.

Literature references: Antonin Artaud, Richard Schechner, Victor Turner, Stephen Greenblatt, Bruno Latour, Erika Fischer-Lichte, Timothy Morton, Donna Haraway, Karen Barad and many more

9. Basic concepts of unconsciousness and self-observation

Vanja Matić & Elena Stevanić

In this lecture you will be introduced to basic concepts of consciousness and unconsciousness from the point of view of analytical psychology, and you will learn how self-observation can help you to increase self- awareness that can be useful for your auto-ethnography project.

In the first part of this lecture we will discuss the role of unconsciousness in helping us create so we could express ourselves, and how and are we possessed by it in our creative moments. We will argue whether our artwork is speaking to others about spirit of time in which it was created, and could people who will watch final products of our workshop understand what we were going trough in this  time of pandemic.

The second part of this lecture is reserved for talk about self-observation, a practice of observing yourself as if another person, or even a camera or video recorder, might see you. You will be introduced to some practical exercises which will help you in observing your thoughts, emotions, feelings, moods, sensations, movements, sound, facial expressions, and so on without any judgment, in order to help you in better creation of your auto-ethnography project.

 

 

Miklós Barna-Lipkovski  (mentor of film, video, editing and coloring) born in Budapest, Hungary (1987). MA of Documentary film-making at the University of Theatre and Film Arts, Budapest.  Technical director of the Visual Anthropology Center. He is a documentarist: he writes, takes still or moving pictures. He also works in theater – taking videos, photos or even acting in indie performances. he is active as a translator, writer and creator of projects, works as a fixer, manages databases - as long as it’s challenging, interesting, enticing and it serves a purpose. Has lived in Italy, Germany, Serbia.
Known for his communication skills, sense for aesthetics, knowledge of history and politics. He is proud of his large international network of friends and colleagues including fellow journalists and artists but all kinds of people who motivate and help him.

Valentino Bianchi  (mentor of photography) was born in 1988 in Rome, Italy. After several years abroad, (England, Spain, Kuwait), he currently lives in Palermo, Sicily. He is a reportage and portrait photographer specialized in the analog and film photography. While he began taking photographs several years ago, he only started taking the medium of photography seriously when he discovered the hands-on nature of black-and-white film and what are now referred to as 'traditional' printing methods. For him, nothing else can do this. “Film photography allows me to consider my work over time as part of a creative process. I thoroughly enjoy develop and printing my own negatives.“ He is currently working on two long term reportage and he documents the everyday life of the people that lives the city of Rome, especially for the Rione Trastevere, working for the local newspapers.

Ana Matićević (mentor of anthropology) is a MA student of Ethnology and Anthropology at the Faculty of Philosophy in Belgrade, Serbia. Beside her main fields of research, anthropology of gender and kinship, political anthropology and migration studies, she is very interested in visual anthropology, photography and (ethnographic) film. ”Chi non ama l'arte non ama la vita.” In 2016, she attended the School of Visual Anthropology and co-authored one film. As a member of the Collective Vizantrop she takes part in publishing the Vizantrop Magazine and organizing the Film Festival of Engaged Ethnographic Film. As a volunteer in different organisations in Serbia and Italy, she gained significant knowledge and experience working and living in intercultural environment. An important thing to remember is that anthropology is everywehere, we just need to capture it.

Nina Mladenović (mentor of anthropology) graduated from the Faculty of Philosophy in Ethnology and Anthropology, and is currently pursuing a master's degree in Cultural Politics and Management in Culture. In 2016 she attended the School of Visual Anthropology (ŠVA) in Belgrade and ŠVA workshop in Skopje and later on, in 2019, became a mentor at this school (ŠVA Belgrade and ŠVA Osijek). She is a part of the Vizantrop collective where she worked on publishing online magazine for interdisciplinary research of audiovisual culture and on organizing festival of engaged ethnographic films – Vizantrop. In April 2019 she participated in a research workshop held in Rovin organized by ETNOFILm Festival. She is co-author of three short ethnographic films screened at festivals in Serbia and the region.

Relja Pekić, (mentor of anthropology) MA of Ethnology and Anthropology at the Faculty of Philosophy, University of Belgrade. Director of the Visual Anthropology Center, Belgrade. Active as a member of the international collective VIZANTROP, editor of their monthly online magazine.

Nikola Radeka (mentor of sonic ethnography, sound design) is an ethnomusicologist from Belgrade. He graduated ethnomusicology at University of Arts in Belgrade (Faculty of music). His master thesis examined tonal relations and tone measurements of old traditional two-part singing of the Banija region. Since 2008. he started to practice Ethnomusicological field research, which included vocal practice of war refugees and buskers in Belgrade, postmortal Vlach rituals, practice of electronic music performers, but mainly old two-part singing of Kordun, Banija and Potkozarje regions, which is currently his main research focus. One of the founders and director of Ethnomusicological activities centre, within which he executed numerous projects regarding ethnomusicological field research in areas of Serbia, Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina, realization of documentary films, as well as festivals of traditional music in Paris and Belgrade. Active as a music producer and electronic music performer since 2015.

Branislav Stevanić (mentor of sonic ethnography, sound design) enrolled Basic academic studies at the Department of Composition in the class of Srdjan Hofman, and graduated in the class of Svetlana Savic at the Faculty of music arts in Belgrade in 2017. At the same time, he attended studies in the Department of Ethnomusicology and completed Master academic studies in 2019, under the mentorship of Dr. Iva Nenic, at the same faculty in Belgrade, with the thesis “Reproduction of social authority, masculinity and creativity: music of fans in the context of professional football in Serbia”. Currently he is on PhD studies in the Department of Ethnomusicology, within which he researching a music in a function of public sound. As researcher of traditional music,  main field for his research interests is Balkan. As composer is working on methods of arts transposition, regarding researching tembrs of traditional instruments from Balkan. He is member of Composer’s Association of Serbia and one of the founders of Ethnomusicological activities centre. Currently he is a professor in music high school “Stevan Mokranjac” in Kraljevo (Serbia).

Diverse individual audio-visual and/or written works for each participant.

All the autoethnographic works of the participants will be presented together online at the end of the course. After the lockdown, Roof Social Center is going to open an exhibition of the works for the local audience.

1) 9 video lectures around 45-60 minutes . Lectures come in 5 blocks (4 in pairs of 2 + 1 separate). Every lecture will be available to participants for 48 hours (through Youtube private link). 

2) 5 written group Q&A sessions; after each block of lectures, students have 48 hours to formulate their questions (concerning the lecture or literature given by the respective professor) and the professors have 48 hours to answer them. This is done in a collective google document. All participants read through already asked questions, so that the questions are not repeated. 

3) 360 minutes of individual mentoring time; Every participant works with 2 mentors, an anthropologist and a selected media specialist. Mentor sessions are done with both mentors at the same time, over JITSI MEETS application. These sessions can be broken into more units, and methodics and dynamics of the meetings are tailored individually between mentors and participant to best correspond to the participant's needs. 

4) 2 group moderated discussions 120 minutes; one moderator, at least one antropology mentor and, all media mentors and all participants are present on JITSI MEETS to discuss their work. 

5) 2 moderated written group feedback; all participants and moderators will get a written guideline (a set of questions and advice) for the written feedback. All participants and moderators have to write a brief feedback to every other participant, based on the shared work in progress. 

6) 2 written individual mentor feedback; one as a response to the definite subject proposal, the other after the course. 

7) online presentation of the works on tumblr and mega.nz.

8) Additional materials: literature (is selected by each professor and is ideally sent to the participants a couple of days before the course); guideline for written feedback, questionnaire for subject proposal, psycho-therapy methodological guideline, syllabus for each lecture, mentoring guideline.

We launch DSAE on an ongoing basis; whenever a new group (7) of participants is formed the starting date of the course is decided.

The school lasts for 35 days (5 weeks). 

The course is divided in IV phases. These phases are not strictly divided. All the deadlines should be met; other than that the workflow depends on the individual participant. 

Phase I: The preparatory phase. It serves for re-thinking and developing the project ideas, as influenced by the lectures and literature. During this time the participant should experiment with different methods and media suggested by professors, and slowly start collecting material for his/hers project. 

Phase IIa: The defining phase. During this phase the participant is expected to define his/hers subject, method, concept and media approach. This can be modified over time, but shouldn’t be drastically changed. 

Phase IIb: In-depth research on the subject; collecting and giving form to the material with guidance and help of the mentors. Mentoring sessions are agreed on between the mentors and participants. 

Phase III: giving the final form to the project. 

Phase IV: enjoying and analyzing the fruits of our work. 

Content:

1) 9 video lectures around 45-60 minutes . Lectures come in 5 blocks (4 in pairs of 2 + 1 separate). Every lecture will be available to participants for 48 hours (through Youtube private link). 

2) 5 written group Q&A sessions; after each block of lectures, students have 48 hours to formulate their questions (concerning the lecture or literature given by the respective professor) and the professors have 48 hours to answer them. This is done in a collective google document. All participants read through already asked questions, so that the questions are not repeated. 

3) 360 minutes of individual mentoring time; Every participant works with 2 mentors, an anthropologist and a selected media specialist. Mentor sessions are done with both mentors at the same time, over JITSI MEETS application. These sessions can be broken into more units; methodics and dynamics of the meetings are tailored individually between mentors and participant to best correspond to the participant's needs. 

4) 2 group moderated discussions 120 minutes; one moderator, at least one anthropology mentor, all media mentors and all participants are present on JITSI MEETS to pitch&discuss their work. 

5) 2 moderated written group feedback; all participants and moderators will get a written guideline (a set of questions and advice) for the written feedback. All participants and moderators have to write a brief feedback to every other participant, based on the shared work in progress. 

6) 2 written individual mentor feedback; one as a response to the definite subject proposal, the other after the course. 

7) online presentation of the works on tumblr and mega.nz.

The course costs 200 euros.

It is possible to reserve a place in the course for 150 euros, than "activate" the reservation with a p2p scholarship that can be purchased through the crowdfunding campaign of the Roof Social Center (P2P scholarship perk)